Fun Fact Friday: Food Related

Interesting:

  • One apple costs 33.2 gallons of water. Apple Juice costs 301.2 gallons per gallon of Apple Juice, and one glass cost 60 gallons of water.
  • One tomato costs 13.2 gallons.
  • One orange costs 13.2 gallons of water. One Glass of orange juice costs 45 gallons of water

Good News:

  • Organics is the fastest growing food segment, increasing 20% annually.
Bad News:
  • In 1970, the top five beef packers controlled about 25% of the market. Today, the top four control more than 80% of the market.
  • In 1970, there were thousands of slaughterhouses producing the majority of beef sold. Today there are only 13.
  • Prior to renaming itself an agribusiness company, Monsanto was a chemical company that produced, among other things DDT and Agent Orange.
  • In 1996 when Monsanto introduced round-up ready soybeans, the company controlled only 2% of the U.S. soybean market. Now, Over 90% of soybeans in the U.S. contain Monsanto’s patented gene.
  • In 1972, the FDA conducted 50,000 food safety inspections. In 2006, the FDA conducted only 9,164.
  • During the Bush administration, the head of the FDA, Lester M. Crawford Jr., was the former executive VP of the National Food Processors Association.
  • The average Chicken farmer (with two poultry houses) invests over $500,000 and makes only $18,000 a year.
  • Supreme Court justice Clarence Thomas was an attorney at Monsanto from 1976to1979. After his appointment to the supreme court, Justice Thomas wrote the majority opinion in a case that helped Monsanto enforce its seed patents.
  • Approximately 32,000 hogs a day are killed in Smithfield Hog Processing Plant in Tar Heel, N.C, the largest slaughterhouse in the world.
  • The modern supermarket stocks, on average, 47,000 products, most of which are being produced by only a handful of food companies.
  • About 70% of processed foods have some genetically modified ingredients.
  • The SB63 Consumer Right to know measure, requiring all food derived from cloned animals to be labeled as such, passed the California state legislature before being vetoed in 2007 by Governor Schwarzenegger, who said that he couldn’t sign a bill that pre-empted federal law.
  • According to the American Diabetes Association, 1 in 3 Americans born after 2000 will contract early onset diabetes. Among minorities, the rate will be 1 in 2.

Fun Fact Friday: Water and News Related

News/ Previous Post Related:

  • On October 26, 2012 Treasure Island, California were without water service for 12 hour and then required to boil drinking water until Monday, October 29 when the boiling notice was lifted. It appears that a water main ruptured, the cause was aging. The 18in cast iron water main was likely an original pipe part of the infrastructure built in the 1930’s when the U.S. Navy inhabited the island.
  • New York City, Long Island Impose gas rationing system to curb long lines at gas stations. Drivers with license-plate numbers ending in an odd number to get gas on odd days and even license plates numbers to get gas on even days. License plates ending in letters are considered an odd number.
  • Laos approves a mega dam on the Mekong river. One of 14 new dams proposed for the Mekong river.
  • Four teenage girls in Africa have invented a generator powered by pee. Urine is put into an electrolytic cell, which cracks the urea into nitrogen, water, and hydrogen. The hydrogen goes into a water filter for purification, which then gets pushed into the gas cylinder. The gas cylinder pushes hydrogen into a cylinder of liquid borax, which is used to remove the moisture from the hydrogen gas. This purified hydrogen gas is pushed into the generator. 
Water Facts:
  • An adult’s body is roughly made up of 70% water. At birth, water accounts for approximately 80% of an infant’s body weight.
  • Water Intoxication: Drinking too much water too quickly can lead to water intoxication. Water intoxication occurs when water dilutes the sodium level in the bloodstream and causes an imbalance of water in the brain
  • The United States uses about 346,000 million gallons of fresh water every day. The United States uses nearly 80 percent of its water for irrigation and thermoelectric power.
  • Consumption in the United States: “8.6 billion gallons of bottled water.” There are approximately 300 million people in the U.S., so it works out to about 29 gallons per person per year.
  • Approximately 85 percent of U.S. residents receive their water from public water facilities. The remaining 15 percent supply their water from private wells or other sources.
  • Water leads to increased energy levels. The most common cause of daytime fatigue is mild dehydration.
  • There are more than 2100 known drinking water contaminants that may be present in tap water, including several known poisons.
  • According to the EPA, lead in drinking water contributes to 480,000 cases of learning disorders in children each year in the United States alone.
  • Tap water often contains at least as much, if not more, chlorine than is recommended for use in swimming pools.
    • More chlorine enters the body through dermal absorption and inhalation while showering than through drinking tap water
  • Chlorine is a suspected cause of breast cancer. Women suffering from breast cancer are all found to have 50-60% more chlorine in their breast tissue than healthy women.
  • Even MILD dehydration will slow down one’s metabolism as 3%.
  • Drinking five glasses of water daily decreases the risk of colon cancer by 45%, plus it can slash the risk of breast
    cancer by 79%., and one is 50% less likely to develop bladder cancer.
  • A rat can last longer without water than a camel. 
  • The price of bottled water is up to 10,000 times the cost of tap water.
  • Americans spend $4 billion per year on bottled water.

 

Crazy World Water Facts

1.  South Korea’s Hanwha Engineering & Construction company signed a $1.05 Billion deal to build a power station and desalination facility in Saudi Arabia. Expected to be completed in 2014.
2.  In Syria, on the other hand, Badia Development project in Hama Governate has completed construction on two water desalination plants totaling approximately $337,000. These plants will be using Charcoal and sand filters to supply clean drinking water to al-Badia inhabitants (addressing extreme shortage issues)
3.  Abu Dhabi implemented an Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) Program, which used the over capacity of desalination plants to replenish the underground water reservoir. Dubai is now following in similar footsteps by implementing a pilot project to recycle 182.5 million M3/year of generated wastewater to help recharge depleting groundwater supplies. Currently, 70% of all municipal wastewater in Dubai is being reused after treatment.
4.  Kuwait has the highest water consumption per capita in the world, around 500 liters per day 
5. South East England mitigates water stress by implementing a 50 million metering program, increasing the number of metered customers to 70% however they will not be charged until 2012.
6. GE Doubles capacity of China Manufacturing facilities, Wuxi- eastern China ( the focus of development on water infrastructure) GE plans to invest $2 billion through to 2012 to expand operations in China. Thus far, the plant includes Recycling, filtration and processing technologies (RO, Ultra filtration, and MWNT)
7. Current Leaky infrastructure adds up to $20 billion: According to Lux Research group the market is growing at 10% and is mostly being financed by spiraling consumer water bills. Lux Research states that a pipe monitoring program and technology would solve most infrastructure issues (there new product: Smart-meter)
8. Mobile Water Systems: with Japans and other recent natural disasters new markets have begun to expand the potable water and mobile water treatment. The expected generated revenues are $895 million by 2016. Currently the geographic breakdown is 
  • Americas: GE and Siemens (70% market control
  • Europe: GE, Degremont, Veolia (60% market share) and Lenntech, Eimco, and Norit 
  • Middle East & Africa: GE, Septech, Al Tamimi, (growth of market because of expansion)
  • Asia- Pacific: None of the top tier companies have a substantial presence: however GE, Siemens, Degremont, and Veolia have regional offices for early entrants. 

17 Minutes Under Water and Still Breathing!!!

What people can do when they focus on an extreme goal is truly amazing. David Blaine held his breath underwater for 17 minutes and 4 seconds on national television on the Oprah Show in 2010, and he contributes all of his perpetration and health record to science research. David Blaine is a magician and stuntman, so most thought is a trick. However, his talk at the TED conference in 2010 takes you second my second through Blaine’s preparation and execution. Discovering that past 6 minutes of no oxygen brain damage occurs, attempting to constantly flush his blood to increase oxygen levels, attempting to insert a rebreather with a Co2 scrubber into his lungs; Blaine began to see that there was no way to establish an illusion of holding your breath. So he turned to free diving and static apnea (holding your breath in one place without moving). Learning how to purge (blow in and out, ridding your body of Co2) entering into an extremely intense diet to rid all extra weight and improve his lung capacity Blaine began to hold his breath.  After four months of training his heart rate lowered to 38 beats per minute that is lower than most Olympic athletes. As a result he could hold his breath for 7 minutes at this point. In training attempts to hold his breath Blaine’s heart rate drops from 38 beats per minute to 12 beats per minute after the first minute. However when it came time to complete the stunt on television Blaine’s heart rate started at 120 beats per minute and stayed at this level for 5 minutes, and it continue to rise to 150. At 10 minutes blood shunting began to occur after 14 minutes he had an “urge to breath” his chest would uncontrollable contract, and ischemia began to set in. At the end of the day David Blaine went from being obsessed with Houdini to surpassing Houdini’s underwater record (3 min 30 sec) by the age of 8 years old to now setting the new world record for holding your breath underwater for 17 minutes and 4 seconds.

Random Water Facts and Disputes

  1. Fire Departments Vs. Public Utilities: Numerous Utilities in North Carolina have had extensive water theft by local fire departments. When I initially heard of this argument, I thought it was a misprint, but it’s not…. Numerous fire departments have been illegally drawing water from hydrants to fill swimming pools and other non-firefighting related activities. Little do they know that North Carolina legislation states that fire departments and other water thefts can be charged $500.00 per misuse or five times the cost of water taken (which can be high). (Call with Warren Public Utility)
  2. According to the AWWA 08 rate study: National water and wastewater charges increased 12.3% and 15.1%, respectively, for a residential customer using 1,000 cubic feet (cf) of water a month between January 1, 2006 and July 1, 2008.  During the same period, the Consumer Price Index (CPI) for all urban customers increased 10.9%.
  3. Between 1996 and 2008, water and wastewater charges for residential customers using 1,000 ccf per month have increased 4.21% and 4.39% annually, respectively, which is greater than the annual CPI increase of 2.87% (AWWA Rate Study, 2008).
  4. Water and wastewater charges are highest in the Northeast while water and wastewater charges are lowest in the Midwest (AWWA Rate Study, 2008).
  5. Even with the charge increases, water and wastewater charges remain affordable as defined by the US Environmental Protection Agency.(National Census Data).